Carr, Glynis. Textual Notes: "Slavery's Pleasant Homes" and Other Writings from The Liberty Bell. The Online Archive of 19th c. U.S. Women's Writings. Ed. Glynis Carr. Online. Internet. Posted: Summer 1997. http://www.facstaff.bucknell.edu/gcarr/19cwoarch/LB/notes.html.


Textual Notes:

Lydia Maria Child's
"Slavery's Pleasant Homes"
and Other Writings from
The Liberty Bell


General Editing Practices

All texts published in The Online Archive of 19th c. U.S. Women's Writings are prepared according to the "Guidelines for Scholarly Editions" of the Modern Language Association of America's Committee on Scholarly Editions (CSE). They are non-critical, diplomatic reprints (i.e., new scholarly editions that reproduce the words and punctuation of the originals exactly, but not their typeface, lineation, and other physical features).

Texts were prepared using "bare-bones" HTML (HTML 2.0, supplemented by certain Netscape extensions, such as underlining). Like all HTML documents, these texts will appear variously when viewed or printed on various browsers or printers. The limitations of HTML are such that the following differences between the appearance of originals and that of the present edition are inevitable:

Specific Matters

Copy-texts for the present edition were obtained on microfilm from the UMI: American Periodicals Series [APS2 Reels 491-492.] Boston: Friends of Freedom (National Anti-Slavery Fair), 1839-1858. Copy-texts were checked against volumes held in the Pattee and Allison Shelley Collections of the Pattee Library, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania. See the "Index to The Liberty Bell" for complete citations.

Typesetters for The Liberty Bell frequently, but not always, separated the suffix "n't" from its base word (e.g., "would n't," "did n't"), apparently to justify the right margin. The present edition omits these extra spaces.

"The Quadroons." In the first paragraph of the text, "Passion flower" has been changed to "Passion Flower." This conforms to Child's practice elsewhere in the text, as well as to popular usage.

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