The Assessment found fish in Shamokin Creek!

 The US Geological Survey, as part of the Shamokin Creek watershed assessment completed macroinvertebrate sampling and electrofishing on October 5-6, 1999. Chuck Cravotta (USGS) provided the preliminary fish species data below. One must realize that this sampling is a "snapshot" of the condition of the stream; it does not indicate what species might be found under other conditions.

 In electrofishing, electrodes produce an electric current in the stream which temporarily stuns fish. The fish are collected in downstream nets, identified and counted, then released unharmed.

 Click for pictures of electrofishing in October 2000 along Carbon Run and Shamokin Creek .

SITE

Total number of species at site

Species Observed

(Counts for individual species not yet available)

Carbon Run (next to strip pond)

1

CC

Tributary to Carbon Run at Site 41

1

CC

Carbon Run at Shamokin Cr

1

CC

Shamokin Cr above and below Carbon Run

0

none

Shamokin Cr above Quaker Run

0

none

Quaker Run above Shamokin Cr

0

none

Shamokin Cr above Rte 61 (at Rte 54)

0

none

Shamokin Cr at USGS gage (Tharpetown - above dam)

0

none

Shamokin Cr at USGS gage (Tharpetown - below dam)

6

CC,SF,FF,WS,PS,BB

Shamokin Cr at Sunbury (below Rte 61)

11

CC,SF,FF,WS,PS,SH,HS,RB,GS,GSH,SB

For example, at the last site in the table, 11 different species were found. Data on the number of individuals of each species are not presented here.

CC = Creek Chub, SH = gizzard shad, SS = spottail shiner, SF = spotfin shiner, FF = fallfish, WS = white sucker, HS = hogback sucker, RB = rock bass, GS = green sunfish, GSH = green sunfish hybrid, PS = pumpkinseed, SB = smallmouth bass

The chemistry and flow at the two Tharpetown sites are the same. The dam associated with the gaging station apparently acts as a physical barrier to the migration of fish. The downstream side of the dam may act as a preferred habitat due to highly oxygenated water. The dam was built to allow accurate flow rate monitoring, which is important to scientific studies of the watershed.

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