COURSE GUIDE, 1996-97

DEPARTMENT: Geology
INSTRUCTOR: Carl Kirby

COURSE NUMBER: GE 105
TITLE: Earth, Health, and Resources

SEMESTER OFFERED: Fall and Spring
PREREQUISITES, IF ANY: none
ANTICIPATED OFFERING IN 1997-8: Yes

ENROLLMENT RESTRICTIONS, IF ANY (SUCH AS "REQUIRES PERMISSION," "OPEN ONLY TO MAJORS," "NOT OPEN TO SENIORS," ETC.) none

I. GENERAL COURSE OBJECTIVE
To critically evaluate claims of the "destruction" of the environment. To examine the effects of earth processes and phenomena upon life and life upon earth processes. To examine risks associated with human activities.

II. DESCRIPTION OF SUBJECT MATTER
This course is a broad environmental science course, covering some subjects often not associated with geology. Topics include:
Local and global chemical cycles, global warming, acid rain, acid mine drainage, ground water, pollution studies, distribution of elements in the earth, element mobility, geologic time, local, regional and global nature of processes, radioactivity, radon, nuclear waste, hydrologic cycle, sources and disposal of wastes, finite resources, population growth, computer modeling, compositions of natural waters, energy conversion and environmental implications, incineration, landfilling, land use, water and wastewater treatment, risk assessment and perception, policy implications.

III. METHOD OF INSTRUCTION AND STUDY
Lecture, discussion, frequent small group work in class, field trips, laboratory exercises. Frequent short writing assignments, peer review and instructor feedback. Hourly exams and a final examination. Group research project, presentation and paper.

IV. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS AND SOURCES
Textbook (required), reserve readings assigned from popular press and scientific journals.

This course satisfies the criteria for the Common Learning Agenda "Natural and Fabricated Worlds" requirement. It is offered as a "W2" course.


Here are some of the sites that GE105 students encounter on field trips:

Lycoming County Landfill

Milton Sewage Treatment Plant

Sinkholes and springs in the Nippenose Valley

Acid Mine Drainage

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